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Frontier Publications

The publications produced by the Society for Environmental Exploration cover a wide range of conservation, biodiversity and development issues. Here you can download any of our publications, ranging from those created by our staff or research assistants working in the field, to those publications produced in collaboration with our in-country host partners which include local universities, government authorities and local and international NGOs.

 

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MADAGASCAR MARINE CONSERVATION RESEARCH PROGRAMME, Phase 181

Madagascar, lying approximately 440km off the East coast of Africa, is the world’s fourth-largest island, its over 5000km coastline supporting over 3500km of coral reefs (Cook et al. 2000; McClanahan et al. 2009). The island is home to approximately 25 million people, who share the land with a variety of fauna and flora. Terrestrial faunal endemism is over 80% for many groups, whilst the marine environment shows lower endemism, characteristic of other areas of the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) (Goodman and Benstead, 2005). The island exhibits high marine biodiversity; the highest coral diversity in the WIO region (62 genera and 323 species) (Veron and Turak, 2005), with reef fish diversity in the Northwest region comprising at least 576 species (McKenna and Allen, 2003). The nation of Madagascar faces challenges in regards to development. Human development index (HDI) for Madagascar was 0.483 (low) in 2012, with approximately 80% of the population living under the international poverty line (UNDP, 2013). Much of the country’s population is involved in subsistence agriculture and fishing, with over half of the population relying on the marine environment for income. Fisheries landings are poorly reported, and fisheries poorly managed, posing serious issues for marine ecosystems and future food security. Monitoring of Madagascar’s reefs is essential to understanding their state, and the effects of environmental and human impacts on reef ecosystems. Frontier Madagascar has been monitoring sites in Northwest Madagascar since 2010. Operating from Ambalahonko, Nosy Be, it uses trained scientists with the help of trained volunteers to collect data on marine fauna of the area, including benthic, invertebrate, and fish data. This report summarises the research and conservation work undertaken from January to March 2018.
year(s) of publication : 2018
author(s): Fanning, E , Price, N , Ferriday, J , Tomboravo, V , Bennett, L
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2018
author(s): Fanning, E , Price, N , Ferriday, J
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2017
author(s): Fanning, E , Clark, R , Szabo, O
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2017
author(s): Fanning, E , Price, N
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2017
author(s): Fanning, E , Price, N , Garrud, E , Cryer, S
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2016
author(s): Fanning, E , Mackenzie, E
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2016
author(s): Fanning, E , Mackenzie, E
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2016
author(s): Fanning, E , Bloomfield, R
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2016
author(s): Fanning, E , Bloomfield, R
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be

year(s) of publication : 2015
author(s): Fanning, E
countries: Madagascar
regions(s): Nosy Be


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